Blessed are those who have music to listen to

By Jon Hillenbrand In Photography, Stories


(By the way, there are more hyphenated-words in this blog post than normal. Please use caution when reading.)

This is a good time to be alive. Despite the money grab from most music artists nowadays, you can still get DRM-free music on Amazon.com. Find a song you like, and almost less than a minute later, you own it. I didn’t grow up with that kind of instant gratification. So I still find it amazing. Seems like it could be both good and bad for the future of society. Modern nations may expel all slow things and only adopt variations on this kind of convenience. Even Subway may get a drive-thru someday. Less-expensive nations will continue along grinding plants into usable cooking ingredients. And then there will be a backlash among the super rich. Slow inconvenience will become very expensive and popular. I suppose some of that is already happening. The hand-made and hyper expensive Lamborghini commands much more respect than the everlast Honda Civic shat out by the daily dozens from automated robot factories. No one cares if a Honda slams into a bridge upright. But a wreaked exotic, well there are whole websites dedicated to viewing those rare shots.

But at present, society is still a mix of fast and uber-slow, convenience and overwhelming suicide/homicide-inducing never ending inconvenience. For example, this person I met at a shoot wants to work as a photographer’s assistant for me on a few shoots. Seems fine to me. I’ll get a much-needed assistant for free and she’ll learn a thing or two about lighting, camerawork and editing. But no. I have to go through 12 steps of lameness from HR like I’m some sort of recovering intern addict. She has to get security access, drug and general health tests, money and time discussed, benefits waivers filled out, endless tax documents initialed and triplicated, blah blah blah. I wrote her all that to see if she’s still interested. No response so far.

So what’s my point? Hold on. Let me think. Sorry, I’ve lost the ability for genuine introspection and abstract conclusion-grabbing. Takes too long. I’ll have to outsource it to a developing nation-state.

What do you think?